Self magazine features plus-size model Tess Holliday on first digital cover

Self magazine features plus-size model Tess Holliday on first digital cover
Self magazine features plus-size model Tess Holliday on first digital cover

Self magazine debuted its first digital cover this week, which showed plus-size model Tess Holliday and said her “health is none of your business.”  (Self magazine)

Self Magazine debuted its first digital cover this week, which showed plus-sized model Tess Holliday and told readers that her “health is none of your business.”

The health and wellness magazine posted the cover to its

We’re thrilled to share our first ever digital cover, featuring model, author, and fat-positivity activist Tess Holliday (@tessholliday). From editor-in-chief @carolynkylstra’s editor’s letter: “Holliday identifies as a fat woman; we chose to give her a platform because she has insightful things to say about thriving in a world that devalues bodies of size. We also chose to feature her because size representation is necessary, especially for a national health media brand that can help guide the conversation about what it means to be healthy and how to make health accessible. You don’t know how healthy or unhealthy a person is just by looking at them, you don’t know what their health goals and priorities are, and you don’t know what they’ve already done or are planning to do for their health going forward. And moreover, you should know that concern trolling—using a person’s perceived health to justify making them feel bad about themselves—isn’t just counterproductive, it’s abusive.” Tap the link in bio to read the rest of the letter. — Photographer: @catherineservel, Wardrobe Styling: @marpeidro, Hair: @christianmarc at @forwardartists using @randco, Makeup: @kristinhilton at @thewallgroup, Manicure: @nailsbyemikudo at @opusbeauty | #TeamSELF

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a portion of Editor-in-Chief Carolyn Kylstra’s editor’s letter, which explains why the publication decided to give Holliday “a platform.”

“Holliday identifies as a fat woman; we chose to give her a platform because she has insightful things to say about thriving in a world that devalues bodies of size,” the letter said. “We also chose to feature her because size representation is necessary, especially for a national health media brand that can help guide the conversation about what it means to be healthy and how to make health accessible.”

It went on to add that a person’s level of health can’t be determined "just by looking at them."

“And moreover, you should know that concern trolling — using a person’s perceived health to justify making them feel bad about themselves — isn’t just counterproductive, it’s abusive,” it said.

Some commenters on the post applauded the magazine’s decision, with one user writing, “Thanks for showing ALL kinds of beautiful women!” and another saying they “adore this!”

Another commenter wrote, “Thank you @selfmagazine for showing the world a range of health bodies – and encouraging people to look at the many important factors that make up a well human.”

Others had a different reaction, however, with one user writing that “this is terribly unhealthy.”

Another commenter said: “She’s so not healthy! I think horrible to promote it. She maybe smart, and an activist but for fat and overweight shouldn’t be glorified ! Bad move.”

Holliday

I’m over the moon to finally share- This is totally surreal to see a fat body on the cover of a health magazine 😭🙏🏻 Thank you Self for changing the game with me! 💕 RP @selfmagazine We’re thrilled to share our first ever digital cover, featuring model, author, and fat-positivity activist Tess Holliday (@tessholliday). From editor-in-chief @carolynkylstra’s editor’s letter: “Holliday identifies as a fat woman; we chose to give her a platform because she has insightful things to say about thriving in a world that devalues bodies of size. We also chose to feature her because size representation is necessary, especially for a national health media brand that can help guide the conversation about what it means to be healthy and how to make health accessible. You don’t know how healthy or unhealthy a person is just by looking at them, you don’t know what their health goals and priorities are, and you don’t know what they’ve already done or are planning to do for their health going forward. And moreover, you should know that concern trolling—using a person’s perceived health to justify making them feel bad about themselves—isn’t just counterproductive, it’s abusive.” — Photographer: @catherineservel, Wardrobe Styling: @marpeidro, Hair: @christianmarc at @forwardartists using @randco, Makeup: @kristinhilton at @thewallgroup, Manicure: @nailsbyemikudo at @opusbeauty | #TeamSELF #effyourbeautystandards

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– on which she dons a pink outfit that leaves her back and tattooed arm exposed -- on her social media account as well, saying that she was “over the moon.”

“This is totally surreal to see a fat body on the cover of a health magazine,” she posted.

The publication shared other pictures of Holliday from the photoshoot as well, in which she sports different outfits.

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